What would you do?

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  • Kobe 310
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    #161561

    I started a forum a while ago about deleted files across a mapped drive. All of the answers were the same, that if you delete a file, it’s gone. Understood!!!

    But what I’m curious about, is how Facebook, Twitter, Ebay, etc work. I guess I’m just assuming that all of these (god knows how many servers) run together. I would think that it would be a good logical guess to assume that the whole world is not stored on 1 server. Meaning 1 user accounts data could be stored across multiple servers.

    I have a setup where I have 3 servers all part of a domain. The platform is set up as Terminal Services. 1 Domain Controller. 1 Terminal Server, and 1 Data Server.

    The company shares files are on the Data Server. So I have a lot of mapped drives from each user’s profile on the Terminal Server, to the Data Server. There are 4 different locations that use these servers.

    I don’t know of any other way to accomplish these users of retrieving a file from the Data Server without mapping a drive, except of coarse a backup. But if you do that once a day, and the person doesn’t realize that they deleted a file till the next day, it’s gone to because the backup has been overwritten.

    I guess what I’m asking, is after reading this, isn’t this the normal way that companies run their severs, if so, I would think by now, there would be something in place to retrieve data deleted across a map, in which makes me think I have this whole platform set up wrong. If I’m wrong, what would you do to set this up properly.

    Thanks

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