Azure Active Directory

Office 365 Successes and Failures Since 2011

by Tony Redmond

Office 365 has experienced great success since its launch in June 2011, but it's also had its share of failures as well. This article considers the most important technical advances in Office 365 and the most important parts of the ecosystem as well as some places where things didn't go quite so well as either Microsoft or tenants would have liked.

Making the Exchange – Azure Active Directory Connection More Reliable

by Tony Redmond

Microsoft posted an odd blog on September 9 to announce improvements in the relationship between Exchange Online and Azure Active Directory. Many Office 365 tenants might have ignored the post, but it's actually about a piece of important work to help the service run better. Many updates happen to Exchange Online objects that need to be replicated to Azure Active Directory and onward to other Office 365 app directories. This work means that changes show up faster, which is good, but there's a small downside to note.

Office 365 Group Expiration Policy Auto-Renews Based on User Activity

by Tony Redmond

The original Office 365 Groups expiration policy was pretty good. It helps tenants keep control of potential group sprawl by removing old groups based on age. Now the policy takes user activity into account. While still not perfect, the new implementation makes the group expiration policy even easier to use because owners don't have to do anything to renew their groups if the groups remain in active use. You might debate the set of activities chosen by Microsoft to represent a good signal of group activity, but not the way the policy now works.