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MJFChat: Getting Ready for Windows Server 2022

 

We’re doing a twice-monthly interview show on Petri.com that is dedicated to covering topics of interest to our tech-professional audience. We have branded this show “MJFChat.”

In my role as Petri’s Community Magnate, I will be interviewing a variety of IT-savvy technology folks. Some of these will be Petri contributors; some will be tech-company employees; some will be IT pros. We will be tackling various subject areas in the form of 30-minute audio interviews. I will be asking the questions, the bulk of which we’re hoping will come from you, our Petri.com community of readers.

Readers can submit questions via Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and/or LinkedIn using the #AskMJF hashtag. Once the interviews are completed, we will post the audio and associated transcript in the forums for readers to digest at their leisure. (By the way, did you know MJFChats are now available in podcast form? Go here for MJF Chat on Spotify; here for Apple Podcasts on iTunes; and here for Google Play.)

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Our latest MJFChat is focused on how IT pros can get ready for Windows Server 2022, Microsoft’s next version of Windows Server. My special guest for this chat was Michael Reinders, a systems engineer and new Petri.com contributor. Michael and I talked about some of what we know — and still don’t — about Windows Server 2022. Michael also answered a number of listener questions in this episode.

If you know someone you’d like to see interviewed on the MJFChat show, including yourself, just Tweet to me or drop me a line. (Let me know why you think this person would be an awesome guest and what topics you’d like to see covered.) We’ll take things from there…

Mary Jo Foley:
Hi, you’re listening to the Petri.com MJF Chat show. I am Mary Jo Foley, AKA your Petri.com community magnate. And I am here to interview tech industry experts about various topics that you, our readers and listeners want to know about. Today’s MJF Chat is going to be focused on how to get ready for Windows Server 2022. And my special guest for this chat is Michael Reinders, a systems engineer and a new Petri.com contributor. Hi, Michael, thank you so much for taking the time to do this chat.

Michael Reinders:
Thank you very much. I’m glad to be here.

Mary Jo Foley:
Great. So this is a huge topic and we’re going to try to keep it to our usual 30 minutes. So I think a good way to start out might be to say, what do we think Windows Server 2022 is? And the reason I say think is because Microsoft’s been dribbling out bits of information about this in kind of a haphazard way over the past year or so. So we do know it’s the next on premises version of Windows Server, and that it’s going to be an LTSC release, which means long-term servicing channel. So Michael, what else do we know about this thing right now?

Michael Reinders:
Yeah, so it’s, it’s going along the line of Microsoft’s recent schedule release of the LTSC releases, Windows Server 2016, Windows Server 2019, and three plus three plus three, Windows Server 2022. So, they’re going in line with what they’ve done. It’s essentially, you know, they’ve been doing, they started releasing the Semi-Annual Channel Server, which included, you know, more features at a steady pace, like every six months with, you know, the Windows 10 client. But this is the, you know, heartened LTSC release, just like with Windows 10. So it’s the standard for again on-premise. So it’s just what you install or upgrade to and get I believe it’s, I think that they’re still saying 10 years of support.

Mary Jo Foley:
Right, that’s good. I’m glad you think that too, because they have been cutting length of support of some of their LTSC products, but I don’t think they’ve said they’re cutting Windows Server so far.

Michael Reinders:
Right, Office 2021, which they just released yesterday, a preview of, that is going to go to five years. I think that’s coinciding with Windows 10 LTSC right?

Mary Jo Foley:
Yeah. Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC, also five years now.

Michael Reinders:
Right.

Mary Jo Foley:
So yeah, we’ll say 10 until we hear otherwise.

Michael Reinders:
Yes, so with the server product it’s interesting. The other note I had right off the bat was, how these are tied together. So they kind of, I know you’re going to ask this a little later on, but cause Windows like Windows Server 2019, the last LTSC that was Windows 10, I think version 1809. So there’s code based similarities. But the thing with this one is, is it’s going to be with Windows 10 21H1 and 21H2 now. Well, probably not because the build numbers are different plus 21H1 is supposed to be the new, you know, the Sun Valley GUI and it’s, yeah. So that’s, that’s kind of the one I’m funny about dribbling out, you know, here’s the month, here’s a one piece of information for the public. We’ll see you in a month. So we’ll see.

Mary Jo Foley:
Exactly I know that was one thing I was going to ask you because a year ago, when Microsoft first said, by the way, this is going to be the LTSE release of Server, they said it’ll be out towards the end of calendar, 2021. But since that happened, I’ve heard from some of my contacts that Microsoft is no longer necessarily tying the release of Server and Client together. They’ve actually decoupled the releases. So if that is true Server 2022, doesn’t have to wait for Windows Server 21H2, right. It could even come this summer, maybe.

Michael Reinders:
They’ve decoupled. Now, does that mean like GA, RTM? I know.

Mary Jo Foley:
That’s a good question. And so I think it just means, I think it means they’re on their own independent tracks for engineering and development. So technically I would think it could mean that server could be out earlier and Jeff Woolsey, who’s one of the big Windows Server guys on Twitter from Microsoft. He’s been hinting around like, yeah, it might be out sooner than you think. And I’m like, Oh, I wonder if they’re going to release Server like maybe late or, you know, mid summer, late summer. They could it’s kind of done, right? I mean, they’re kind of in the final phases of it.

Michael Reinders:
I mean, it’s fun. It’s interesting because now really quick. Yeah. So like the other question about decoupling is like the code base. So I, of course we have no idea what the build number set is going to be for 21H2 for Windows 10, because of course the dev channel is not tightened released, blah, blah, blah. But they’re making, and then I’ll get to this a little later on, but they are making, there’s like branding changes even on the recent builds in terms of what it’s called. Cause like, I don’t know, a month, month and a half ago, they finally dubbed and put in a sub program Windows Server 2022. And they pseudo, publicly announced that. But now recently they’ve stripped that out and it says, you know, Windows, no it says Microsoft Server Operating System set up instead of just like set up. So that just happened, but we’ll see, we’ll see what that means.

Mary Jo Foley:
Right. So that is interesting. I saw that change being, well, it wasn’t announced, it was acknowledged. I think one of our frequent commenters Tero Alhonen, he posted a picture of it. And then somebody from Microsoft on the server team, I’m forgetting who this was said, you know, don’t read too much into that. This is just us using a placeholder name because of how we have Azure, gosh, they have so many names now, Windows Server, Azure something. So I think they need to rename this and I think they need to rename the whole family of Azure and Windows Server because of how they do hybrid computing. Right. It’s very confusing, these different names, like Azure Stack HCI, and now they’ve got Windows Server, Azure Edition. I’m like, okay, so they’ve got to have some more consistency in the naming because it’s very, I think it’s very choppy and kind of unclear what is what anymore.

Michael Reinders:
Right. Because I got that. Yeah. Azure, you said the magic word cause a couple of years ago you discovered that, you know, the engineering, like I think it was January and June is when Microsoft, at least on the client side, finalizes the code base, so to speak for Azure. Literally for Azure first and then, you know, enterprise customer’s, home later, but that’s how they you know, the engineering model. So that’s the question, is so like this is nothing really pertinent pertinent, but, when you host, when you have a Windows Server, like when Azure hosts Windows Server for say SQL server, what are they using? Are they, you know, when do they solidify their, their build of Server 22? Are they using server 2019 on the backend to host everything in Azure for all the customers. That’s another curiosity if this is tied to Azure in anyway.

Mary Jo Foley:
Yep. So this kind of leads me into another question for you. Do you, as a tester of Server actually get any more help or information from Microsoft about what’s, like, I feel like we get a lot of new builds of Server and we just see a post go up saying, yeah, there’s a new build of Server out. And there’s absolutely nothing in it. As far as a change log, a list of new features, a list of fixes, nothing. I’m curious if testers actually see or know anything more than that.

Michael Reinders:
Yeah. So I don’t know if I’m, I guess I’m officially, I mean I’m technically a tester. But yeah, so the Windows Insider program in the past announced these builds and yes, they often did not show almost any new features, not like the Windows 10 client builds. But, I even pressed one of them kind of a month ago maybe. So I noticed that Windows Server 22 preview build, blah, blah, blah, just came up, you know, what, is there information anywhere? He actually let me know. So there’s a Windows Server Insiders community forum that actually is hosting and posting these releases. So we can have, you know, put that, publish that on Twitter somewhere after this. So that actually does announce each of the new server builds coming out. There’s two builds from August or September, actually, 2201, 2206 that actually describe the new features that are coming in 2022 from a pretty detailed standpoint, which we’ve probably seen, probably is what you’ve probably posted back in September or that timeframe or August about what’s coming.

Michael Reinders:
I mean even the new features, they’re not, they’re barely saying anything about what is new and included I’m sure. Which leads, to your theory about it being “done”, that it’s probably just being tweaked, branding, fixing you know, last minute bugs, that kind of thing. But in terms of that, I don’t have any access on, like I said, I just discovered that forum like less than a month ago. So there is one bug or question in Server 22 that I’ll get to later on. That’s one of the questions that we’ll get to later.

Mary Jo Foley:
Okay, so we’ve kind of hinted that there aren’t a ton of new features, at least ones we’ve seen them post about in this coming release, but is there anything that they have said that you think could be especially interesting to IT Pros or really stands out? So I saw they have some things coming with Azure Arc, you know, as a way to manage and govern Windows Server. They’ve got things about storage migration service and some new threat protection, but is there anything that you saw that you were like, okay, that’s really interesting that that’s in there, or is it just kinda more goodness all the way around?

Michael Reinders:
Yeah. I think to go this all the way around there’s there is some UDP performance improvements, TCP performance improvements, that looks interesting, that you’ll just be in general once you get, you know, once you’re running that server. AES-256 encryption, which I believe is new, I think it’s going to be an option. Compression being added for when you’re doing like Robocopy or Xcopy using that to copy files from A to B, there’s some compression. And it’s compatible with patched Windows Server 2019 and Windows 10 computers also have this. So if you’re copying from any one of those machines to a Server 22 file server, it’s going to actually compress that. That’s probably going to be stupid faster. So that’ll be an IT Pro kind of like, okay, cool. You mentioned storage migration. I’m just looking through the post here, you know they’re, Microsoft releasing a new LTSC release on-prem because enterprises need it.

Mary Jo Foley:
Exactly.

Michael Reinders:
Does Microsoft really nitty gritty want to? Ah, well, we’d rather just get everybody up in the cloud. So it’s a good, especially with 2019 and 2022, at least they’re high-level Windows Server marketings, then this will help you get into Azure.

Mary Jo Foley:
Right? Exactly, exactly.

Michael Reinders:
Server, like the containers. So they always keep optimizing the server core containers space-wise I mean, even just like an install of 2022 like the core version, which doesn’t include the GUI, it uses 8 gigabytes on the virtual machine in the C: drive, which is crazy small.

Mary Jo Foley:
Yeah. Yep. Nice. Okay. We have a lot of people who submitted questions on Twitter about this chat, and a lot of them are very specific. They want to know, is this feature going to be in. I realize, unless you have some secret back channel, we may not know the answer to all of these things. But I’m going to ask them anyway. And, you know, saying don’t know is a totally acceptable thing here, but I think it just shows people are super curious about what’s coming with this. So Miha Pecnik on Twitter asked if you know of anything coming on the Active Directory front specifically. And he said, you know, based on what we’ve seen so far, it doesn’t seem like a release with a lot of features, but he’s very interested in AD.

Michael Reinders:
Yeah. So, so in terms of AD features, and this is probably the question of, it typically has been tied to, you know, other domain and functional levels that are added. So like, cause Windows domain, when you have an on-premise domain, you have a forest and a domain functional level, it’s kind of like spur on security, with features in like the Active Cirectory Users and Computers tool. So they essentially stopped, so far at Windows Server 2016. So when you upgrade to Windows Server 2019, your domain controllers, there’s no new forest or functional level. So it hasn’t been publicly announced or specified, but, and I’m actually going to probably find out which I’ll allude to, I’m going through a a mock in about a month, but just testing, upgrading Server 2016 on-premise domain and AD domains 2022 as well, probably find out for sure, but it doesn’t look like there’s going to be new forest and domain functional levels in 2022. And this probably ties to enterprise, let’s keep things clean. Let’s keep things easy. We’re getting people into Azure Active Directory, who cares about AD. Again, just kind of a, kind of a high level marketing potential theory from Microsoft,

Mary Jo Foley:
Okay, cool. That was actually one of the questions specifically about the forest and domains that Tero Alhonan had, he asked a lot of questions on Twitter for this chat. So one of the ones I thought was kind of interesting is if you’ve seen in any of the builds that you’ve been testing any references to the code name of which engineering branch this might be from. So, you know, Microsoft’s using the periodic table of elements to refer to the different semesters when they build features. So he said, have you seen anything that indicates whether Server 2022 is Iron, Cobalt or even Nickel? Have you seen anything like that?

Michael Reinders:
This is Iron right now it’s Fe_release. I’m not sure when that started, but so when you install them the, Oh goodness, what do you call it in the lower right corner of the, oh Windows 10 Insiders have always loved when they removed that, we’re getting closer and closer to release.

Mary Jo Foley:
Oh yeah, the watermark, right? The watermark thing, yeah.

Michael Reinders:
So Windows Server 20, right when they started saying Windows Server 2022 data center or standard. Yes. So it is Fe_release. So it will be Iron which is interesting to see because the Windows 10 dev just went to Cobalt.

Mary Jo Foley:
Right.

Michael Reinders:
Which of course, it’s interesting, because again, if we’re thinking, and of course they just switched to Cobalt. I think they were on Iron. So maybe that last branch, before they branched Windows 10 to Cobalt that Iron release, they might’ve just frozen that code per se, or are keeping that in sync with Server 22, and that’s how they’re going to, I don’t know, because then it doesn’t make sense because what’s 21H2, Windows 10 going to be, ah I know it’s crazy.

Mary Jo Foley:
You know what makes this even harder to explain to people from my standpoint is in the old days, you could say a particular code name referenced, it basically was equal to what they were building inside of engineering, but that isn’t the case anymore. So, they have semesters when they build features, but you don’t necessarily have to take all the features that are built in a semester to put it into a publicly available release. Like you could even take something from a future release and backport it to something. So it really confuses the lines, right? It’s not just like Cobalt. You can’t just say Cobalt is 21H2. You can’t say that because there may be features from Iron. There may be features from Nickel coming into those different things. So, yeah, it’s hard because we all want something very definitive that we can call a release, like have a code name, but it doesn’t work like that anymore.

Michael Reinders:
Right, cause Windows 10, 20H2, it’s kind of the last minute, from the dev build, they were like, they tweak the start menu. And I know Mary Jo, you were a total fan of GUI,

Mary Jo Foley:
I was like stunned at that.

Michael Reinders:
Looking at how it was and how it is now, and you would say, I don’t know, same difference.

Mary Jo Foley:
I know, I’m terrible in that way. I really don’t have an eye for UI and UX changes very much so,

Michael Reinders:
But they put that into 20H2 like, which they can, but it was kind of a surprise. And then of course they just announced with it Wednesday, yeah this week, the News and Interests is now going to like all supported versions, That was yesterday, so you missed it on Windows Weekly. So that’s been going back to all supported versions of Windows 10, not just last 6, oh my goodness.

Mary Jo Foley:
I know it’s a big messy world.

Michael Reinders:
Huge preview for next Windows Weekly.

Mary Jo Foley:
I know, right. Okay, I’ve got more questions from Tero. He had a lot of things to ask. He wanted to know about DNS over HTTP for a 2022. And I don’t know if you’ve heard anything about whether the Windows DNS Server is getting this particular feature or not, but he was wondering,

Michael Reinders:
Yeah, I know that like on the client’s side, I haven’t seen it on a server and I would, because that’s kind of big and I totally would’ve assumed that that would have been even sprinkled out from Microsoft by now. So I’m guessing, no, but I don’t know for sure.

Mary Jo Foley:
Okay. That’s good. He also wanted to know about WSL, which is the Windows Subsystem for Linux V2. The new one, if that may be supported in Windows Server 2022?

Michael Reinders:
So this is literally a, we don’t know. And I’ll tell you why, while trying to be as brief as I can. So I got one of the Windows Server 22 test builds, and I was going to try that because I saw that question. So of course on Windows 10 Insider builds and Windows Server, 22, you go to an administrative command, prompt or PowerShell, you type WSL space, dash dash install. It literally does everything for you, it’s ridiculous. But installs the sub-components, downloads Ubuntu, and ask you to reboot your machine. So when I go through those, I look online to find the commands, to enable WSL 2 and make that Ubuntu version 2. So as soon as you type that command in and I confirmed it, hit enter and it just, it basically spits back as if you typed in WSL dash help, like the commands you can use. So I found online it’s been broken in like the last month or so, enabling WSL 2. And there’s been no response from Microsoft yet. So will WSL 2 support being toward 22. I have no idea we’re going to find out before it’s released, I guess.

Mary Jo Foley:
Yeah, I would guess yes, right? I mean, is there any reason it wouldn’t?

Michael Reinders:
I don’t know. I don’t know why it wouldn’t and I know, I don’t, my brain doesn’t naturally go to using WSL on a server, but that’s my lack of experience, but I have no idea why they’ve had WSL version 2 for, I don’t know, a year in one of those channels. Why they, and it’s not, I don’t know if you could even enable it on Server 2019. I’m not sure, but it would be very odd. And if they did not make sure it’s fixed for release.

Mary Jo Foley:
Okay. a couple more, very specific feature questions. Matthew Reyes wondered about TLS version 1.3 and will it be available in IIS?

Michael Reinders:
So actually I did see the TLS version 1.3 will be on by default and you’ll have to, which means, you know FTP HTTPS, you know, and IIS, so that should be out of the box. Probably, they’re always on the security mantra. I’m sure you would have to optionally, you know, enable TLS 1.1 or 1.2. 1.0, might even be like out of support or something, but yeah, TLS 1.3 will be on by default.

Mary Jo Foley:
Okay, great. Daniel Viklund asked about ADFS 5.0 support for multi-tenant, multifactor authentication registration. Wow, that’s a mouthful. You know anything on that?

Michael Reinders:
That I’m not sure. I know ADFS, at least if he’s asking ADFS 5.0, that’s tied to Windows Server 2012R2, unless I read that wrong. That I honestly don’t know. I mean, when I hear MFA registration, I think of Azure AD. So it might be just something I’m not familiar with, but that I have not seen a yes or no answer on.

Mary Jo Foley:
Okay, great.

Michael Reinders:
I don’t know.

Mary Jo Foley:
Yeah. There’s a lot of, you know, I feel like that’s the biggest thing I write anymore when it comes to Windows, we just don’t know

Michael Reinders:
That’s the chain, that’s the way it is right now.

Mary Jo Foley:
All right. Now let’s, let’s do some pure speculation stuff. Padre Pedro on Twitter wanted to have you do some guesses about how Windows Server might evolve over the next decennium. That’s a big question mark. Okay. So he specifically asked about classic roles. So he means things like WSUS you know Remote Desktop, DNS, DHCP, clustering. Do you think these will get, or get again somewhat decent attention? Or do you think these will be downplayed in the future? Any just kind of random observations on that?

Michael Reinders:
Yeah, I’m, like we said earlier, I would guess things will simply be downplayed and slowly deprecated. WSUS, then you go to, I haven’t tried it on 2022, but I remember doing it on Windows Server 2019, just installing the WSUS, i don’t know if it’s a role or probably a feature. Essentially unchanged from, I want to say Server 2012, not even R2, like server 2012. So it’s all going on 10 years. It’s there, and again, that’s probably, I mean, I know Remote Desktop Services, they’ve kind of done some tweaks on recent server releases. And AD of course, like I said, it’s there. They haven’t had any change features to it. I think this is just every three years. It’s just moving more of these. And again, all of these services have either been reimagined, replaced, you know WSUS is no SCCM or Windows.

Michael Reinders:
Microsoft Configuration Manager in the cloud with Azure, that handles the exact same duties that WSUS handles. WDS, you know Windows Virtual Desktop could even be a, not technically accurate, but it could be a replacement, DNS, DHCP, I mean that’s all handled by, can be handled by Azure clustering. Again, there’s some clustering new features. But it’s more like for the IT Pro. I think there’s some more network validation tests, I believe now with the fail over cluster service role, which is obviously a good thing. And you have a better, before you get that cluster going, it’s going to confirm that all the networking’s right. But like I said, I think it’s just this slow because this is enterprise and there’s hundred thousand PC companies out there, slow transition to the cloud. I mean, I believe if Microsoft had their way, they wouldn’t be releasing a new, you know, like the Office 2021 on-prem essentially, not Microsoft 365, you know, new project server or a new SharePoint server. They would just have one good hub. Cause they have one Azure engineering base to support and grow.

Mary Jo Foley:
Yeah. I think that would be their goal too, but I think it’s great that they are still continuing to listen to customers and make available these on-premises products. And these aren’t the last versions either. They’ve said there’ll be more coming in the future. So yeah, I think that’s goodness for sure. Okay. So any last things you want to make sure to add about Server 22? And I wanna, I don’t know if I’m letting the cat out of the bag here, but I know you’re working on a series for Petri about Server. Could you talk a little about that and what you’re doing there?

Michael Reinders:
Yeah, yeah. So I just kind of hinted at that before. Like I said, I just, I bought myself a new desktop computer, which I haven’t done in 15 or 20 years as an aside,

Mary Jo Foley:
Wow.

Michael Reinders:
I’ve always had with my, you know, my day job, I’ve always had at least a laptop from work essentially. And I didn’t use it as a personal device, blah, blah, blah. But it’s a silly, not inexpensive HP, you know, the C2 kind of enterprise workstations, and it’s loaded with Ram and hard drive space. So right now, so I’m building, I have a Windows Server, 2016, a couple of domain controllers, a a file server on Core file server. I’m using Windows Admin Center, which is the tool to manage that they released, which I was actually at Ignite 2017 where they literally announced Windows Admin Center. I don’t think it was even called that then, it was operation or code name something. I don’t remember. So I have all these and I added in another file server. So I’m gonna plan to go through and upgrade this environment.

Mary Jo Foley:
Yeah, that’s cool. Like a real hands-on like, here’s what it’s like to upgrade.

Michael Reinders:
Right. So it’s kind of like the series is going to be like, okay, here’s IT Pro getting ready for Windows Server 2022? What do you need to know? What are the gotchas, what do you need to plan for, you know, before you upgrade your file server. You make sure you do these things. Before you upgrade your domain controllers, which of course is huge. You know, in the past it’s been, you have to spend money for a third party to make sure everything is right or pay Microsoft to do it right, because it was so intricately involved and so high risk and impact. But we just know like the day job I have, we did that about a year ago, we went from 2008R2 to Server 2019 for our domain controllers. And there were a few little gotchas posted, but I mean, it was within a week or so.

Michael Reinders:
I mean, we were done, and it’s, you know, for domain controllers. So anyway, it’s still a foundation to your on-premise Active Directory domain. So I’ll be going through that over the next couple of months. Hopefully it all ties in with, you know, the actual release and it’ll be a good series for IT Pros to keep tabs on because we know it’s Microsoft. So we know there’s going to be a surprise. And why was this at the last minute? Or why was this added or he didn’t tell us about this. So hopefully we’ll, Petri and I can keep everyone in tune.

Mary Jo Foley:
That’s awesome.

Michael Reinders:
No pun intended.

Mary Jo Foley:
Great. Also I wanted to ask, as a last question, any other resources you’d recommend for IT Pros who are trying to keep up with what’s going on with Windows Server. We mentioned the blog that they have, that you found recently where they talk about some of the new builds that they’ve been putting out with Server 2022, but is there anything else you use regularly as a resource yourself to keep up with this?

Michael Reinders:
I don’t think anything beyond what we mentioned. Like I said, I’m following a good number of the server PMs. And like you said, Jeff Woolsey’s definitely one of the heads of Windows Server. A couple of the heads of Azure in terms of the Azure platform, I guess you’d say, but you know, like following a lot of people on Twitter and just again, I literally literally just discovered this a couple of weeks ago, the Windows Server Insiders Community Forum that is actually publishing these new releases. But aside from that, it’s mostly, you know, like techcommunity.microsoft.com. They are publishing new features, mostly on Windows 10 or Office, Microsoft 365 Apps for Enterprise, that kind of thing. But I actually don’t have any really secret or even a common thing beyond what we just mentioned.

Mary Jo Foley:
All right. Well, thank you so much for taking the time to do this. I found it super interesting and I know the readers and listeners will too. So thanks, Michael.

Michael Reinders:
You’re very welcome. Glad to be here.

Mary Jo Foley:
Great. And for everyone else, who’s listening right now to this chat or reading the transcript. I’ll be putting up more information soon about who my next guest is going to be. Once you see that you can submit questions directly on Twitter using #MJFChat for that guest. In the meantime, if you know of anyone else or even yourself who might make a good guest for one of these chats, please do not hesitate to drop me a note. Thank you very much.

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