How To

Teams Introduces Tagging for Targeted Communications

by Tony Redmond

Teams is all about communication, but now you can have "targeted communications," which is a long-winded way to describe tags. A tag is a shortcut method to address a set of team members. You can have default tags defined at the organization level or use tags specific to individual teams. Either way, tags are a useful way to identify the specific people you want to address in a conversation.

Understanding the PowerShell 7 Error Variable

by Adam Bertram

As with any programming language, code will have errors and troubleshooting those problems can be difficult. Thankfully, PowerShell has a rich error object and several powerful tools to help debug your code. With PowerShell 7, these tools become even more useful and error handling even easier. As the language evolves and becomes used in more… Read More

Using Office 365 Sensitivity Labels with Teams, Groups, and Sites

by Tony Redmond

Office 365 Sensitivity Labels can now be applied to "containers" - Teams, Office 365 Groups, and SharePoint sites. Sensitivity labels replace the old text-only classifications that have been available since 2016. The labels don't affect the contents of the containers, but they can control some container settings, like whether a team allows guest access or if it's open to any tenant user to join. It's yet another development in the label and protection story for Office 365.

SharePoint Online Embraces Office 365 Sensitivity Labels

with 2 Comments by Tony Redmond

SharePoint Online is embracing Office 365 Sensitivity Labels to allow protected documents to be processed by indexing and available to content searches. The Office Online apps (Word, Excel, and PowerPoint) also support the application of sensitivity labels. The only disappointment is that the SharePoint Online and OneDrive for Business browser interfaces don't allow labels to be applied to documents.

Understanding SharePoint Online Versioning

by Tony Redmond

SharePoint Online document libraries keep 500 versions of files by default. The minimum recommended by Microsoft is 100. But why are so many versions kept? The reason is that it leads to better recoverability and underpins features like AutoSave and co-authoring. You might be tempted to reduce the number of versions, but why? I can't come up with a good answer.

Teams Gets Closer to Email

with 2 Comments by Tony Redmond

Since its inception, Microsoft Teams has had an odd relationship with email. Some think that Teams will replace email, at least for many internal conversations. The real facts are that Teams and email need to survive and co-operate together as collaborative modalities for Office 365 tenants. Microsoft is introducing three new features to help Teams gets along better with email, and that's a good thing.