Networking

Remotely Enable Remote Desktop on Windows Server 2003

With Remote Desktop on Windows XP Professional or Windows Server 2003 (in Windows 2000 Advanced Server, this feature was called Terminal Services in Remote Administration Mode), you can have access to a Windows session that is running on your computer when you are at another computer.

What you need to do is create the new RDP listening port via the registry:

  1. Run REGEDIT on your XP workstation or on your Windows 2000/2003 Server.
  2. Click on File, then choose “Connect Network Registry”.

Sponsored Content

Passwords Haven’t Disappeared Yet

123456. Qwerty. Iloveyou. No, these are not exercises for people who are brand new to typing. Shockingly, they are among the most common passwords that end users choose in 2021. Research has found that the average business user must manually type out, or copy/paste, the credentials to 154 websites per month. We repeatedly got one question that surprised us: “Why would I ever trust a third party with control of my network?

  1. In the Select Computer search box either browse Active Directory to locate the remote server, or type its name in the dialog box.

Click Ok.

  1. In the remote machine’s registry browse to the following key:
​HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server
  1. Under the Terminal Server key find the value named fDenyTSConnections (REG_DWORD). Change the value data from 1 (Remote Desktop disabled) to 0 (Remote Desktop enabled).

Click Ok.

  1. Close Regedit.
  2. Reboot the remote machine for the change to take effect. You can easily do so by opening a command prompt and typing the following command:

shutdown -m \\srv1 -r

After the remote machine reboots, Remote Desktop will be enabled on it. To test this from your workstation, open Start -> All Programs -> Accessories -> Communications -> Remote Desktop Connection. You can also type mstsc in the Run command.

Enter the name of the remote server in the Remote Desktop Connection logon box, supply your administrator password when prompted, and press Enter or click Ok.

Related articles

You might also want to read the following related articles:

Related Topics:

13 Email Threat Types to Know About Right Now

As email threats evolve and multiply, keeping track of them all—and staying protected against the many different types—becomes a complex challenge. Today, that requires more than just the traditional email gateway solution that used to be good enough.

In this eBook you will learn:

  • What are the most common and challenging email attacks for organizations?
  • How to defend against sophisticated email threats, such as spoofing, social engineering, and fraud
  • How to protect employees at the inbox level with the right technologies and security-awareness training
  • How to use a multilayered protection strategy to reduce susceptibility to email attacks and better defend your business and employees

Sponsored by: