Coming Soon: GET:IT Endpoint Management 1-Day Conference on September 28th at 9:30 AM ET Coming Soon: GET:IT Endpoint Management 1-Day Conference on September 28th at 9:30 AM ET
Windows Server 2008

Identify Your Windows Vista/2008 Operating System Version and Architecture in 2 Steps

In order to successfully install Hyper-V on a Windows Server 2008 server, you must meet the required system and hardware prerequisites. One of these is to have a hardware that’s capable of running 64-bit operating systems, and to actually install a 64-bit version of Windows Server 2008 on it. Another prerequisite is to have the correct build of Windows Server 2008, as there are some builds that are either “without Hyper-V”, or are of a type that does not support Hyper-V at all (such as the Web edition).

In a previous article, “Installing Hyper-V on Windows Server 2008”, I’ve detailed the complete list of requirements for installing Hyper-V.

It’s safe to assume that if you’re in the business of installing servers, you’re also supposed to “know” what you’re doing… but there are some cases where one needs to know what type of operating system is installed on the server/PC/laptop, for example, in case you were not the person that has initially installed the machine. In that case you’d better make sure it supports Hyper-V and that is has the appropriate license to operate it, before starting to install the role.

Sponsored Content

Say Goodbye to Traditional PC Lifecycle Management

Traditional IT tools, including Microsoft SCCM, Ghost Solution Suite, and KACE, often require considerable custom configurations by T3 technicians (an expensive and often elusive IT resource) to enable management of a hybrid onsite + remote workforce. In many cases, even with the best resources, organizations are finding that these on-premise tools simply cannot support remote endpoints consistently and reliably due to infrastructure limitations.

To find out what kind of Windows Server product is currently installed follow these steps:

In the Start menu, either click on the Command Prompt shortcut, or, if not present, type “cmd” and press Enter.

In the command prompt window type the following command and press Enter:

​wmic OS get OperatingSystemSKU

The number that is returned corresponds with Microsoft’s list of SKU numbers for Windows Server:

  • 7 = Windows Server 2008 Standard Edition (full installation)
  • 8 = Windows Server 2008 Datacenter Edition (full installation
  • 10 = Windows Server 2008 Enterprise Edition (full installation)
  • 12 = Windows Server 2008 Datacenter Edition (core installation)
  • 13 = Windows Server 2008 Standard Edition (core installation)
  • 14 = Windows Server 2008 Enterprise Edition (core installation)
  • 42 = Hyper-V Server 2008

Only the above version numbers will work with Hyper-V. If any other number is returned, this means that you should not try to install Hyper-V on this server, as it will not work on it.

If we’re at it, you should also check the architecture of the server installation as well.

To find the architecture of your OS, follow these steps:

In the Start menu, either click on the Command Prompt shortcut, or, if not present, type “cmd” and press Enter.

In the command prompt window type the following command and press Enter:

​wmic OS get OSArchitecture

The architecture should be 64-bit in order to be able to install Hyper-V.

Links:

Additional Microsoft product info codes and their meanings are available here.

Related Topics:

Live Webinar: Active Directory Security: What Needs Immediate Priority!Live on Tuesday, October 12th at 1 PM ET

Attacks on Active Directory are at an all-time high. Companies that are not taking heed are being punished, both monetarily and with loss of production.

In this webinar, you will learn:

  • How to prioritize vulnerability management
  • What attackers are leveraging to breach organizations
  • Where Active Directory security needs immediate attention
  • Overall strategy to secure your environment and keep it secured

Sponsored by: